naRSH9103QLB Qualitative Methods
(3 credits)
Syllabus Effective Date: 7/1/2012

Course Description:
This purpose of this course is to provide the Learner with skills essential for the interpretation and application of qualitative research, data collection and data analyses appropriate for qualitative inquiry. This course is designed to provide Learners with an overview of qualitative research approaches.

Number Of Activities: 11

Learning Outcomes:
1.  Compare and contrast common qualitative designs and give examples of appropriate application based on study research problems, purposes and research questions.
2.  Compare and contrast interpretive frameworks and relate to proposed study.
3.  Select a qualitative design based on the proposed study purpose, and include a rationale for appropriateness and support with foundational research methods literature.
4.  Describe credibility and validity issues as related to qualitative research.
5.  Describe potential ethical implications in qualitative studies.
6.  Create an annotated bibliography.
7.  Describe the appropriate collection, coding and analysis and reporting techniques relative to the proposed qualitative inquiry.

Course Concepts:
1. Fundamentals of qualitative methods
2. Fundamentals of qualitative research designs
3. Ethnography, grounded theory, case studies, content analysis, and phenomenology
4. Qualitative data analysis
5. Foundational researchers in the field
6. Ethical implications in qualitative data collection and reporting

Primary Resources:
These resources are required to complete the course.

Please make sure that you purchase the primary textbook(s) that match the syllabus you are issued. Please let your assigned Mentor know through the Northcentral University messaging system what text(s) you have purchased. Northcentral cannot be responsible for Learner purchase of books that do not match assigned syllabi.

Book
Shank, G. D.   (2006).  Qualitative research: A personal skills approach   Upper Saddle River, NJ:   Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.   ISBN: 0131719491  
Book
Schram, T. H.   (2006).  Conceptualizing and proposing qualitative research.  Upper Saddle River, N.J.:   Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall   ISBN: 0131702866  
Book
Trochim W. M. K., & Donnelly, J.   (2008).  The research methods knowledge base  (3rd ed.).   Mason, OH:   Cengage.   ISBN: 9781592602919  
Book
Patton, M. Q.   (2002).  Qualitative research & evaluation methods  Thousand Oaks, CA:   Sage Publications.   ISBN: 9780761919711  
Book
American Psychological Association.   (2010).  Publication manual of the American Psychological Association  (6th ed.).   Washington, D.C.:   Author.   ISBN: 9781433805615  

You may purchase books at www.ncubooks.com.


Additional Resources:
These resources must be used to complete the assignments.

Document/Other
Nature of Research 
NCU Nature Of Research 05 01 2008.ppt
Document/Other
NCU Dissertation Review Form (DRF) 
Document/Other
Rogers, R.   (2000).  Through the eyes of the instituion: A critical discourse analysis of decision making in two special education meetings.  Anthropology and Education Quarterly,   33  (2),  213-237.   http://search.proquest.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/docview/218104424?accountid=28180  
Document/Other
Crepau, E. B.   (2000).  Reconstructing Gloria: A narrative analysis of team meetings.  Qualitative Health Research   10  (6),  766-787.   http://qhr.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/content/10/6/766.full.pdf+html  
Document/Other
Golafshani, N.   (December 2003).  Understanding reliability and validity in qualitative research.  The Qualitative Report   8  (4),  597-607.   http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR8-4/golafshani.pdf  

Supplemental References & Readings:
These resources are not required, but may provide assistance in completing your work for this course. Please copy and paste any web links listed below into your browser to view the websites.
Denzin, N., & Lincoln, Y. (2008). Strategies of qualitative inquiry (3rd ed.). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. ISBN: 9781412957564

Gall, M. D., Gall, J. P., & Borg, W. R. (2007). Educational research: an introduction (8th ed.). Boston: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon. ISBN: 9780205488490


Glaser, B. G., & Strauss, A. L. (1967). The discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for qualitative research.  New York: Aldine de Gruyter.

Moustakas, C. E. (1994). Phenomenological research methods. (6th printing.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. ISBN: 978080395799

Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (2008). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory (3rd ed.). Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications Inc. ISBN: 9781412906449

Van Manen, M. (1998). Researching lived experience: Human science for an action sensitive pedagogy (2nd ed.). Ontario, Canada: Althouse Press. ISBN: 9780920354421

Yin, R. K. (2003). Case study research: Design and methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. ISBN: 9780761925521

http://www.qsrinternational.com

http://www.researchmethodsarena.com/

http://www.socialresearchmethods.net

http://psych.athabascau.ca/html/aupr/tools.shtml

http://www.hebes.mdx.ac.uk/teaching/Research/PEPBL/SDM.htm

http://www2.chass.ncsu.edu/garson/pA765/design.htm

http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/proj/res_meth/

http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR3-4/jones.html

http://www.gslis.utexas.edu/~ssoy/usesusers/l391d1b.htm

General Information:

Credit Hours:

With the faculty-mentored approach at Northcentral University, credit hours are amassed in a course through student-to-faculty interaction, contact with course-specific content, assignments, and other asynchronous activities. At Northcentral, students can expect to devote between 135-144 hours for each 3-credit course.

Course Participation:

Federal Financial Aid regulations, which Northcentral observes for all students, require that students regularly participate in courses in which they are enrolled. All students must log into the course room at least once per week in order to avoid being noted as a non-participant. Students must use the Northcentral messaging system on the course web site to contact faculty. Should you be unable to participate in your course, you must contact your Academic Advisor who can advise you on the consequences of withdrawing from your course.

Preliminaries/Pre-Course Survey:

Students should review the Student web site and Course Catalog, which contains all relevant policies and procedures. Students should also complete the Pre-Course Survey. The survey goes directly to the faculty and gives the faculty information about new students entering the course.

Assignment Submissions:

The assignment header should include the student's last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number (DoeJXXX0000-1) justified to the left and the page number justified to the right. Faculty may request students to submit an assignment cover sheet, located under University Documents on the Students site. Assignments that do not include cover sheets should have an APA style title page.

The file submittal format consists of the student's last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number (no spaces between characters): DoeJXXX0000-1. Files may be submitted in Word or in the program with which the file was created. Faculty may request resubmission of an assignment using a different file format or program if they cannot access a submitted assignment. In the event that the student is unable to submit the assignment to the professor on the date due through any of the above referenced methods because of computer problems, the student is required to email the assignment to the faculty on or before the assignment due date. In such cases, the student should also communicate with the professor to inform of the assignment transmission.

Northcentral University has adopted the 6th edition of the APA Publication Manual as the style guide for all coursework. Students are expected to follow the APA manual when completing assignments, unless instructed otherwise.  Although the APA manual does not apply to syllabi, NCU attempts to adhere to the manual in its syllabi within technical limitations.

Faculty have the discretion to allow and request resubmission of any assignment, with these stipulations: Comprehensive Exam courses are excluded; graded assignments with objectively correct answers (e.g., statistics assignments) may not be resubmitted; the bulk loading policy may not be violated; the policy that assignments may not be submitted after a course end date may not be violated. Students may decline to resubmit assignments. Faculty cannot request resubmissions in cases of suspected academic integrity violations.


Schedule for Course Completion:

Students may submit assignments early, but the required due date must be met. Faculty will not accept bulk assignments except as explained below under “Submittal Turn-Around Schedule”.  Submitting assignments in the order assigned and reviewing faculty feedback before completing the next assignment  ensures progression according to academic standards and follows the design of the course.

Submittal Turn-Around Schedule:

Faculty have 4 days from the assignment due date to grade and return assignments. If an assignment is submitted early, the faculty may return it prior to the required return date, but they have until 4 days from the assignment due date to return feedback. If an assignment is submitted late, faculty have 4 days from the date of submission to grade and return the assignment. If, for whatever reason, the faculty does not return the assignment within 4 days, the student can submit their next assignment to maintain his/or her assignment due date requirement. Other than these circumstances, students are not allowed to bulk upload assignments. Some courses may have exceptions. Please carefully read all course syllabi. 

 

Note: Turn-around time for courses in the dissertation sequence, excluding CMP courses, range up to 21 calendar days.

Activity Submission Schedule:

 

The Academic Week at Northcentral University begins on Monday and ends the following Sunday night at 11:59:59 pm Arizona time. The assignment due dates for 12 week courses are mandatory.

 

Northcentral University has designed programs and courses around best practices in adult and online learning theory. Students will gain maximum benefit from courses when they are participating fully in each week's activities and assignments according to the course schedule. The University's late policy supports effective time management skills for maximum classroom success.

 

Course Assignments:

 

Each activity is due at the end of an academic week, no later than Sunday at 11:59:59 pm AZ time. For instance, an activity might be scheduled across a two-week period to be completed during the second and third week of the course.  This activity must be completed during that period and must be submitted no later than Sunday evening at 11:59:59 pm AZ time of the third week. Assignments submitted after the original deadline will be considered late, and graded according to the faculty's discretion. Papers submitted 7 or more days beyond the original due date will not be accepted. For example, if an assignment is due on Sunday at or before 11:59:59 pm AZ time, that same assignment will not be accepted if received any time on the following Sunday. No assignments will be accepted after the last day of class.

 

Academic Integrity:

 

Academic integrity includes the commitment to the values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. Appropriate credit of others for the scientific work and ideas applies to all forms of scholarship, not just publications. The submission of another person’s work represented as that of the student’s without properly citing the source of the work will be considered plagiarism and will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the work submitted or for the entire course, and may result in academic dismissal. Assignments will be submitted by the faculty member to TurnItIn.com for originality evaluation.

 

Self-plagiarism is the act of presenting one’s previously used work as an original work. Self-plagiarism is inconsistent with honesty and truthfulness in scholarship. Northcentral University faculty and students should discuss the expectations of each activity at the beginning of the class. There should be a clear understanding between the faculty member and student regarding the use of prior work in the class. The faculty member must indicate if the student’s response must be an original work or if the student may use prior work in their response to a new activity. For further information on self-plagiarism, review this guide noted in the NCU Writing Center on the subject.

  

Course Learning Assessment/Course Grade:

Students are expected to complete all performance requirements for the course and to demonstrate mastery of the course concepts and course learning outcomes. This may require students to use library resources and to document research with citations, bibliographies, and references as applicable in completing their coursework. Mastery of course concepts may require demonstration of critical thinking and communication skills by a combination of term papers, self-assessments, quantitative reasoning, interviews, observations, written assignments, or other activities.

Mastery of course concepts as demonstrated by successfully completing the performance requirements will determine the grade for this course. Students must follow directions and assignment requirements in the syllabus.

Grading Scale:

The following chart shows the percentages of points awarded to the letter grade for Undergraduate and Graduate grades.

Undergraduate Scoring

 

Graduate Scoring

 

Numerical Points

Letter Grade

Numerical Points

Letter Grade

100-94

A

100-94

A

93-90

A-

93-90

A-

89-87

B+

89-87

B+

86-83

B

86-83

B

82-80

B-

82-80

B-

79-77

C+

79-77

C+

76-73

C

76-73

C

72-70

C-

72-0

F

69-67

D+

 

 

66-63

D

 

 

62-0

F

 

 

 

Northcentral Grading Rubric:

The grading of each assignment is based on the percentages in the Northcentral Grading Rubric: 70% content and 30% presentation. The percentage is calculated by dividing the actual points earned by the total number of points possible for an activity, with the resulting percentage determining the letter grade for the activity or course. View the Northcentral Grading Rubric

Exceptions to the Rubric:

Certain courses/activities do not warrant a written product. Examples include math courses involving solving equations or courses that contain multiple choice exams. In these cases, the writing portion of the rubric does not apply. Scoring for these courses will be based on how many items were answered correctly out of the total number of items possible.

 

Course Overview

Section 1: Developing a Qualitative Orientation
Activity 1:   Memos to Focus Your Inquiry   (10 Points)
Section 2: Interpretive Frameworks
Activity 2:   Clarifying Your Perspective   (10 Points)
Activity 3:   Frameworks for Your Study   (10 Points)
Section 3: Focusing Qualitative Inquiry
Activity 4:   Forming Research Questions and Approaches   (5 Points)
Section 4: Choosing a Research Approach
Activity 5:   Preliminary Research Design   (10 Points)
Section 5: Dissertation Committee Formation
Activity 6:   The Dissertation Committee Process   (0 Points)
Section 6: Validity, Credibility, Dependability, and Ethics in Qualitative Research
Activity 7:   Establishing Integrity   (10 Points)
Activity 8:   Validity, Ethics, and Integrity   (10 Points)
Section 7: Qualitative Data Analysis and Reporting
Activity 9:   Preliminary Data Analysis and Reporting Plan   (10 Points)
Section 8: Final Comprehensive Activity
Activity 10:   Update Annotated Bibliography   (5 Points)
Activity 11:   Final Comprehensive Activity   (20 Points)
Section 1: Developing a Qualitative Orientation

The purpose of qualitative research study is to describe, interpret, verify, and evaluate (Leedy & Ormrod, 2001). The qualitative problem statement is the underlying rationale for the research study. The problem statement sets up the issue and/or phenomena in need of interpreting, evaluating, making sense of, defining, and/or describing. The problem statement is complemented by the purpose statement, and proposed research question(s). In total, these components propose a way to set forth the resolution to the problem you will attempt to bring meaning to the phenomena.

Required Reading:
Trochim & Donnelly - Chapters 1, Sections 1-1f, Chapter 6
Shank - Chapter 1
Schram - Chapters 1, 2
Patton - pages 1-73

Activity 1:   Memos to Focus Your Inquiry   (10 Points)
4  Focus Your Inquiry
Based on the required readings, respond to Exercises 2.1 (Distinguishing research purposes), 2.2 (Clarifying the focus and locus of inquiry) and 2.3 (Generating an analytic memo) of the Schram text. Your responses should be in the form of memos. Each memo should be brief, but clear and include sufficient detail in your responses to demonstrate evidence of your ability to think critically about the subject matter. Please include all three memos in one document.

Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-1.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

Learning Outcomes: (1, 2)
  • Compare and contrast interpretive frameworks and relate to proposed study.

  • Section 2: Interpretive Frameworks

    Required Reading:
    Patton - pages 75-137
    Shank - Chapter 5
    Schram - Chapter 3

    Activity 2:   Clarifying Your Perspective   (10 Points)
    4  Clarify Your Perspective
    Based on the required readings, respond to Exercises 3.1 (Trying on different lenses) and 3.2 (Developing sensitivity to your perspective) of the Schram text. Each memo should be brief, but clear and include sufficient detail in your responses to demonstrate evidence of your ability to think critically about the subject matter. Please include both exercises in a single document.

    These are the links for the two required readings in Exercise 3.1:
    Crepau, E. B. (2000). Reconstructing Gloria: A narrative analysis of team meetings. Qualitative Health Research, 10(6), 766-787.  
    http://qhr.sagepub.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/content/10/6/766.full.pdf+html

    Rogers, R. (2000). Through the eyes of the institution: A critical discourse analysis of decision making in two special education meetings. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 33(2), 213-237.
    http://search.proquest.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/docview/218104424?accountid=28180

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-2.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (2, 3)
  • Compare and contrast interpretive frameworks and relate to proposed study.
  • Select a qualitative design based on the proposed study purpose, and include a rationale for appropriateness and support with foundational research methods literature.

  • Activity 3:   Frameworks for Your Study   (10 Points)
    4  Discuss Frameworks
    Based on the required readings, provide a 1-2 page discussion of the interpretive framework(s) (e.g., such as those described in chapter 5 of the Shank text) that best fit your perspective and proposed study. Provide appropriate rationale for the chosen framework(s) and include sufficient detail in your responses to demonstrate evidence of your ability to think critically about the subject matter.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-3.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (2, 3)
  • Compare and contrast interpretive frameworks and relate to proposed study.
  • Select a qualitative design based on the proposed study purpose, and include a rationale for appropriateness and support with foundational research methods literature.

  • Section 3: Focusing Qualitative Inquiry

    Required Reading:
    Patton - Part 2
    Shank - Chapters 2, 3, 4, 6
    Schram - Chapters 4, 5
    Trochim & Donnelly - Chapter 8



    Activity 4:   Forming Research Questions and Approaches   (5 Points)
    4  Form Your Research Questions and Approaches
    Based on the required readings and your proposed study topic, respond to Exercises 5.1 (Assessing your question’s goodness of fit) and 5.2 (Aligning purpose and research question) of the Schram text. Please include both exercises in a single document.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-4.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (3, 5)

  • Select a qualitative design based on the proposed study purpose, and include a rationale for appropriateness and support with foundational research methods literature.
  • Describe potential ethical implications in qualitative studies.

  • Section 4: Choosing a Research Approach

    Qualitative research is multi-method in focus, involving an interpretive, naturalistic approach to a phenomenon. This means that qualitative researchers study things in their natural settings, attempting to make sense of or interpret phenomena in terms of the meanings people bring to them. Qualitative research involves the collection of a variety of materials such as case studies, personal experiences, life story interviews, observations, historical, and meaning in individuals' lives in communities and families. Qualitative research uses unreconstructed logic to get at what is really real -- the quality, meaning, context, or image of reality in what people actually do, not what they say they do as gathered from questionnaires.

    Required Reading:
    Shank - Chapter 7
    Schram - Chapter 6
    Supplemental readings based on research design
    Dissertation Review Form (DRF)



    Activity 5:   Preliminary Research Design   (10 Points)
    4  Proposed Preliminary Research Design
    Based on the course readings, appropriate supplemental readings, proposed research problem, and revised purpose statement, expand on the preliminary qualitative research design in a 3-4 page document. Provide appropriate support and rationale for the design choice. Include appropriate foundational research methods related to the design choice (e.g. Yin for case study, Moustakas for phenomenology). Cite your references and use APA formatting and APA table formatting.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-5.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (3, 5, 6)
  • Select a qualitative design based on the proposed study purpose, and include a rationale for appropriateness and support with foundational research methods literature.
  • Describe potential ethical implications in qualitative studies.
  • Create an annotated bibliography.

  • Section 5: Dissertation Committee Formation

    Required Reading:
    NCU Dissertation Handbook

    Activity 6:   The Dissertation Committee Process   (0 Points)
    Since the development of this course the process for securing your dissertation committee has changed. The Graduate School has refined the process for committee formation and committee change requests. When you arrive at the comprehensive examination component of their doctoral program the following processes should be followed:

    1. COMMITTEE FORMATION: Students identify potential committee members from lists of faculty members (posted on the Dissertation Center), complete the Dissertation Chair Committee Student Request form (posted on the Dissertation Center), and email the form to the Graduate School at committeerequest@ncu.edu.
    2. COMMITTEE CHANGES: Students discuss the need for a committee change with their Academic Advisor and complete the Committee Change Request form (posted on the Dissertation Center). Students should include a clear description of the need for a change and substantiating documentation. Then, the Academic Advisor emails that completed form to the Graduate School.
    For this activity please become familiar with this new process. You will not form your committee at this time.

    Learning Outcome: (12)

    Section 6: Validity, Credibility, Dependability, and Ethics in Qualitative Research

    The elements of validity and reliability determine the assessment of the quality and rigor of the research. Reliability is the extent to which other researchers would arrive at similar results. External validity is the extent to which the findings can be generalized. Internal validity is the extent to which the researcher can demonstrate that the emergent themes, constructs, and perspectives are true (thick description). Anticipate the ethical issues that may arise during the research process and the outcome of the data analysis.

    Required Reading:
    Patton, pages 405-417 and Part 3, Chapter 9
    Shank - pages 109-122
    Schram - Chapters 7, 8
    Golafshani, N. (December 2003). Understanding reliability and validity in qualitative research. The Qualitative Report, 8(4), 597-607.


    Activity 7:   Establishing Integrity   (10 Points)
    4  Establishing Integrity
    Based on the required readings and your proposed study topic, respond to Exercises 7.1 (Preparing for how you will talk about data and 8.1 (Anticipating ethical challenges) of the Schram text. Please include both exercises in single document.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-7.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (4, 5)
  • Describe credibility and validity issues as related to qualitative research.
  • Describe potential ethical implications in qualitative studies.

  • Activity 8:   Validity, Ethics, and Integrity   (10 Points)
    4  Validity, Ethics and Integrity
    Based on the proposed study topic and previous course activities, submit a 1-2 page paper describing how your proposed study will demonstrate validity (as appropriate to the qualitative design), ethical principles, and integrity.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-8.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (4, 5)
  • Describe credibility and validity issues as related to qualitative research.
  • Describe potential ethical implications in qualitative studies.

  • Section 7: Qualitative Data Analysis and Reporting

    Required Reading:
    Patton - Part 3, Chapter 8

    Activity 9:   Preliminary Data Analysis and Reporting Plan   (10 Points)
    4 Submit Preliminary Plan
    Based on the course readings and proposed study topic and qualitative data collection, submit a preliminary qualitative data analysis and reporting plan and describe why it is appropriate to the chosen study design.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-9.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcome: (7)
  • Describe the appropriate collection, coding and analysis and reporting techniques relative to the proposed qualitative inquiry.

  • Section 8: Final Comprehensive Activity

    Required Reading:
    Schram - Chapter 9
    Shank - Chapters 11, 12
    Supplemental primary sources based on chosen research design
    Dissertation Review Form (DRF)

    Activity 10:   Update Annotated Bibliography   (5 Points)
    4 Submit Updated Annotated Bibliography
    Take this time to update your annotated bibliography with the research and readings you have done. Submit your updated annotated bibliography for your Mentor's review and comments.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-10.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcome: (6)
  • Create an annotated bibliography.

  • Activity 11:   Final Comprehensive Activity   (20 Points)
    4 Submit Final Comprehensive Activity 
    Based on your problem statement, purpose statement, research questions, method, and design identified in RSH9101, RSH9102 and course activities, compose a comprehensive paper in which you discuss the envisioned context and variables in your proposed research. Also, include discussion of envisioned data collection method and analyses along with the reasoning behind your selection. Finally, propose plans to ensure validity and reliability of your outcomes. The expected length of this assignment is 8-15 pages.

    Use APA style in preparing your paper and citing references (i.e. the paper should follow APA for all paper and text formatting). Please save your file using NCU's file naming protocol (e.g., DoeJRSH9102-11.rtf). Submit the document in the Course Work area below the Activity screen.

    Learning Outcomes: (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7)
  • Compare and contrast common qualitative designs and give examples of appropriate application based on study research problems, purposes and research questions.
  • Compare and contrast interpretive frameworks and relate to proposed study.
  • Select a qualitative design based on the proposed study purpose, and include a rationale for appropriateness and support with foundational research methods literature.
  • Describe credibility and validity issues as related to qualitative research.
  • Describe potential ethical implications in qualitative studies.
  • Describe the appropriate collection, coding and analysis and reporting techniques relative to the proposed qualitative inquiry.

  • Post Course Survey:
    Complete the Post Course Survey after submitting your final assignment. The Post Course Survey goes directly to the University and provides information used in both course and Mentor evaluation and assessment. The Post Course Survey is located in the Course Review section of the Learner web site. THE RESPONSES ARE ANONYMOUS.

    Receiving Your Final Grade:
    The final grade should be posted by your Mentor within one week following the course end date. The registrar will send an e-mail notifying you of your grade, and the grade will appear under the Course Review section on your Learner site.
    Syllabus Effective Date: 7/1/2012
    Syllabus Details